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I often ask myself if I shouldn’t feel sorry for the short memory seemingly possessed by some politicians it would be all too easy to name.

Image of part of  a Sailing to Purgatory webpage to illustrate the article.
What a comedian ... The Chief, er, Character knows how to cheer up his audience and possibly even the almost revered listeners. Photo by Ben White on Unsplash
But then I remind myself about my own short memory.

Obviously, the lucky electorate of the most democratic country in the world is being treated to a wonderful, if not exactly well written soap opera.

It has an intriguing title - Brexit.

Magical twist

I’m giving it a capital letter, because the wordy watchdog Grammarly will show it as a spelling error if I don’t.

It just might be that the title doesn’t actually deserve it.

The comedy had a magical twist tonight.

The Chief, er, Character as this actor is termed - whether he’s the #1 villain or not – turns on his colleagues to threaten them with the chance that the goal of the play will not be realised unless they behave and obey.

It might well be that the majority on stage don’t actually want the offered conclusion because they can see the crookery, with which we in the audience are only too familiar.

And yet the Chief, er, Character, being a not quite grown-up kid himself, knows that the threat of withdrawing a treat (desired or not) is a perfect punishment for winning children round.

The Fool like the Chief, er, Character know this well because they supported and played a major part in a big red bus that toured the country offering the closest to propaganda that most of us will have seen outside of a war.
So, stamping a foot, he’ll deny them the conclusion they don’t want and give them a general poll, which they are unprepared for.

Temper tantrums

Calamity, major upset, temper tantrums, even if mostly this emanates from the Chief, er, Character himself.

The Fool introduces quite a linked-up laugh from episode to episode. He, incidentally, seems decidedly fooled by the Chief, er, Character himself.

The chuckle follows his reminder that it’s The Public themselves, the audience, in fact, that wants – that demands – the mysterious Brexit.

The Fool like the Chief, er, Character knows this well because they supported and played a major part in a big red bus that toured the country offering the closest to false propaganda that most of us will have seen outside of a war.

The Chief, er, Character and The Fool know how to win hearty laughter from the gallery. They keep reminding the cast, reminding us all, that the misled, propagandised public voted for it. It raises a good chuckle, of course, because they leave out the adjectives of misled and propagandised.

We of the audience are kept guessing whether it’s because the Chief, er, Character and The Fool didn’t turn up for the lesson at their public school when the pronunciation of the word, and the definition of honesty, were being taught.

The performance is such a laugh anyway that often one or two can be heard applauding, occasionally.

Thanks very much for visiting the mostly Tuesday and Thursday blogs for my adventure book, Sailing to Purgatory, which are introduced each time on Facebook Facebook dot com/Sailingtopurgatory and on Blogger,

Links:
Wikipedia: propaganda defined

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The blogs for Sailing to Purgatory are introduced on Facebook and Blogger.